Wednesday, June 20, 2012

Glen Eyrie and HDR photos

At Glen Eyrie, I took a hike with Kathy to Dawson Troutman's gravesite, high on a mountain. While up there, I tried an experiment with HDR photography (I think it stands for high dynamic resolution).  You can take these photos on an iPhone if you have the space and time available, or you can take them on a digital camera if you set your camera to bracket your photos.

What's bracketing?  It's when your camera takes three (or even five!) shots of the same thing--one underexposed, one perfectly exposed, and one over exposed.  The idea is that when you combine the three shots, you get all the brights and all the lowlights, all the things a "perfectly" exposed picture can't capture. So you get a deeper, more realistic shot.

Of course, when you're taking three shots of the same thing, you either need a tripod or VERY steady hands.  I didn't have a tripod, but I stayed still and did my best to get steady shots.

So here are some of my HDR pictures from Glen Eyrie. Click to enlarge, and enjoy the beautiful red rocks on these mountains!

~~Angie

The castle from the top of a nearby hill. 


The Castle. See why we love it so much? 

Blooming mountain cacti. 

What a sky. 

The castle and carriage house are at the center of this shot.

The red rocks found in the Garden of the Gods. 

Looking down on the Glen Eyrie grounds. A beautiful place. 

4 comments:

Mocha with Linda said...

Beautiful!

Anonymous said...

These are beautiful, Angie. There's something a wee bit eiree about them ... (bad pun, I know) but I really like the effect. Glen Eyrie was a great place to experiment with this process, and you did a wonderful job of it! Oh, I hope I can go again next year! Clyde

Kay Day said...

I really like them. What a fun process to play with!

Sparky said...

Angie, you are a wonderful photographer! These shots are beautiful. Glen Eyrie is a wonderful place where I just feel surrounded by the Holy Spirit. The Writer's Workshop was amazing and I already signed up for next year as a personal incentive to reach my goal of having something written to share. Thanks for all the hard work you and the other instructors do to make the workshop possible.